The oldest incorporated town in Alabama has connections to two US Presidents [old photographs & film]

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Even though it encompasses only 64 acres, Mooresville can boast to being the oldest incorporated town in Alabama and has a connection with two Presidents of the United States.  The town also has the oldest, still operational post office in the state of Alabama.

Entire town is on National Register of Historic Places

The tree-shaded streets and white picket fences in Mooresville take you back to a simpler time. Mooresville is a town in Limestone County, Alabama, United States, located southeast of the intersection of Interstate 565 and Interstate 65, and north of Wheeler Lake. Often referred to as “Alabama’s Williamsburg,” the entire town of Mooresville is now included in the current listings of the National Register of Historic Places.

Mooresville, established 1818

Mooresville tree shaded

Connection with President Andrew Johnson and President Garfield

Mooresville is the site of Old House, in which President Andrew Johnson, the 17th President of the United States, was a tailor for a short time.  President James A. Garfield preached in Mooresville in the old white clapboard Church of Christ in 1862, while he was encamped nearby during the Civil War.

Church of Christ where President Garfield preached

Mooresville, first church of Christ garfield

Old Brick Church built in 1839 on Lauderdale Street, Mooresville, Alabama with a hand pointing to Heaven on the steepleOld Brick Church built in 1839 on Lauderdale Street, Mooresville, Alabama by Carol Highsmith 2010

First incorporated town in Alabama Territory

Located twenty miles southwest of Huntsville in Limestone County, Mooresville is the first incorporated town in the Alabama Territory. Some of present day trees in Mooresville may date back to the 1800’s.

Prior to the settlers, the Chickasaws resided in the area of Mooresville. In 1818, Mooresville had sixty-two residents and petitioned the Territorial Legislature for an Act of Incorporation, a year earlier than when Alabama became a state.

 

Oldest Operational Post Office in Alabama

Post Office, Mooresville, Alabama 2010 by Carol HighsmithPost Office, Mooresville, Alabama 2010 by Carol Highsmith

Post office, Mooresville, Alabama 2010 by photographer Carol HighsmithBuilt after 1840 of sawmill lumber and now owned by the Town of Mooresville, the Post Office is located at the corner of Lauderdale and High Streets.

Hundley House, Market Street, Mooresville, Limestone County, AL ca. 1935 by photographer Alex BushAlex Bush, Photographer, May 20, 1935 FRONT AND SOUTH SIDE, FACES EAST - Hundley House, Market Street, Mooresville, Limestone County, AL

W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 8, 1934 Henry Zeitler House, High Street, Mooresville, Limestone County, ALW. N. Manning, Photographer, March 8, 1934. REAR AND SIDE VIEW. - Henry Zeitler House, High Street, Mooresville, Limestone County, AL

W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 31st, 1934. FRONT VIEW – WEST ELEVATION. – High Street (Old Tavern), Mooresville, Limestone County, ALW. N. Manning, Photographer, March 31st, 1934. FRONT VIEW - WEST ELEVATION. - High Street (Old Tavern), Mooresville, Limestone County, AL

W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 31st, 1934. OLD POST OFFICE – High Street (Old Tavern), Mooresville, Limestone County, AL
W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 31st, 1934. OLD POST OFFICE. - High Street (Old Tavern), Mooresville, Limestone County, AL

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  • Treaties and building the first roads in Alabama.

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About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. She has authored numerous genealogy books. RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE) is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2) is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series) Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1) is the continuation of the story. . For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. She has authored numerous genealogy books. RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE) is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2) is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series) Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1) is the continuation of the story. . For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

14 Responses to The oldest incorporated town in Alabama has connections to two US Presidents [old photographs & film]

  1. I am from ALABAMA and I enjoy all the ALABAMA PIONEER articles so far I have about 4 and I read them and enjoy them very much. I am from OPELIKA,AL.but I have been living in California for 59 years.but my memories are still very clear of where I’m from.

  2. Melba Clark says:

    Do you have a photo of the house where Andrew Johnson stayed in Mooresville? My husband and I lived in the upstairs of that house when we were newlyweds.

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  4. Joseph Meeks says:

    I was born and raised in Indiana, but enjoyed many trips to Alabama growing up. My Dad was born and raised there (near the now extinct Falls City in Winston county,where Clear Creek Falls is now under Lewis Smith lake. My GreatGrandDad had built a dogtrot cabin near there in 1907) My GreatGreatGreatGrandDad Britton Meeks first visited Coosa county back in the 1840’s. I really enjoy all of your postings and have been a fan since January.

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  6. My family is fro Choctaw and Washington counties.have a lot of fond memories of visiting there in past years.

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  8. Neat little community!

  9. Would love to visit this town.

  10. Marie Casey says:

    I enjoy reading your blog since my father’s family was from Anniston/Oxford and Heflin areas. My mother’s family is from the Huntsville/Hartselle areas. Almost twenty years ago my mother and I, with my young children, stopped to do some sightseeing in Mooresville because she had heard the movie “Tom and Huck” was filmed in the town. I quickly recognized some of the buildings in your photos. Thank you for the additional information on this lovely historic community and the opportunity to walk down memory lane.

  11. Love this little town. It’s beautiful.

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